+7 Ways Your Cat See “I Love You” in Cat Language.

Ways Your Cat Cats, “I Love You” in Cat Language.

Unlike dogs, cats don’t greet their owners with wagging tails and sloppy kisses, but that doesn’t mean they don’t have genuine affection for their owners. But what are some methods to show your cat signs of affection that go a little deeper? By learning more about innate cat behavior. So for that, we will give you in this article. +7 Ways Your Cat Cats, “I Love You” in Cat Language.

Gaze Softly Into Your Cat’s Eyes

Did you know that you can show your cat affection by looking at her? It just takes some finesse. “When you look at your cat, always use a soft gaze and never a hard stare,” says Pam Johnson-Bennett, CCBC, and best-selling author of “gateways.” “In the animal world, we view a direct stare as a threat.”

“If you really want to amp up the affection factor,” Johnson-Bennett adds, “offer a slow eye blink.” In cat language, blinking slowly signals that you’re relaxed and mean no harm. If your cat feels the love, too, she might blink back. “we commonly refer this to as a cat kiss,” Johnson-Bennett says.

Head bumps and leg rubs

Cats have scent glands concentrated on certain parts of their bodies, including their cheeks and heads. When your kitty rubs her head or faces against you, she’s marking you with her scent and claiming you as part of her family group. This scent is a source of both comfort and familiarity for your kitty.

Following You

If you have a cat, you probably know she’s going to follow you wherever you go. We mean literally everywhere. In fact, it can start to surprise new cat owners when their cat watches them in the bathroom or they wake up to a cat staring in their faces. But never fear, these felines aren’t trying to spy on your every move in order to plan their next attack. They’re actually following you around because they love being by your side! While she might not be sitting in your lap the entire time, just wanting to be in the room with you is proof that she needs and wants you around.

Tail position

How your cat holds her tail can tell you a lot about how she’s feeling. A tail held straight in the air is often used as a greeting, so you know your kitty is happy to see you. In fact, Dr. John Bradshaw, author of the book, “Cat Sense,” says this is “probably the clearest way cats show their affection for us.”
A tail held upright with a curve at the tip like a question mark also indicates familiarity, friendliness, and affection.

Show Your Cat Signs of Affection Every Day

Even if your feline is fairly low-maintenance, show your cat love daily. As Krieger says, “It is mandatory that cat lovers schedule that special petting, cuddling, stroking time with their cats—that is, for cats who like to be stroked and cuddled.” And for those cats who don’t, you’ve hopefully discovered a few new ways to enjoy that quality time.

Create a Treasure Hunt

Hunting and foraging are natural cat behaviors, but it’s understandable if your cat isn’t doing much of either in your living room. You can change that by creating a food treasure hunt for cats. “Place food and treats on cat trees, shelves, in puzzle toys and boxes and other spots for the cat to search for,” says Marilyn Krieger, a certified cat behavior consultant known as The Cat Coach and author of “Naughty No More.” The hunt should start easy, with food placed where your cat can see it. You can increase the difficulty by putting food in harder to reach places like cat trees, but don’t make it too hard, says Krieger. “The game should challenge, not frustrating.”

Nurture Your Cat’s Inner Predator

Cats are natural predators, but those chewed-up mouse toys behind the couch don’t make very challenging prey. “I think one of the best ways to show love for your cat is to engage them with interactive playtime every day,” says Delgado. “Interactive play means you move a toy—such as a feather wand or Cat Dancer toys—like prey, so your cat can let loose as the predator they are built to be.” Not only does this activity nurture innate cat behavior, but it provides a stress-reducing workout, too. “It’s a great way to bond,” Delgado says, “especially when your cat isn’t the cuddly type.”

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